Towards a just Europe.

A just Europe benefits us all. By implementing the following measures it can be achieved:

Please choose solution:

Transformation Now!

Humankind has formed our planet like no other species. 97% of all scientists confirm that the ongoing increase in global temperatures is anthropogenic. Ramifications of this climate catastrophe can already be perceived: Storms, floods and heat waves have become the new normal. Despite the fact that they contribute only very little to total greenhouse gas emissions, it is the poorer segment of the population in Europe and in the global south that suffers the most from global warming. In order to stop these developments and to be able to avert catastrophic long-term consequences, an immediate re-orientation towards new modes of production as well as modes of living is necessary.

New Indicators of Prosperity

Tightly interwoven into all issues related to climate policy and sustainable development, is the discussion concerning the rating of living standards and progress. Currently, economic growth (GDP) is the indicator most commonly used. Until now, increase in wealth and economic growth went hand in hand with greater emissions. Implementing new indicators for wealth marks a crucial step towards prioritising the aims of sustainable development. This would highlight their importance in the debate about the future which has, so far, been dominated by economic considerations. We have to make every effort to adjust our ways of life to our planet's finite resources and to distribute life opportunities as evenly as possible. For it is clear: the climate objectives will only be met if we reduce our overall energy consumption and distribute it anew.

In doing so, transparency is pivotal. Conventional pollution measurement methods apportion emissions occurring during manufacture of products to the country where the production site resides. By outsourcing the production of pollution-intensive goods to other countries, emissions are omitted from domestic statistics – even if these wares continue to be consumed nationally. Simply rendering domestic production cleaner will therefore not suffice. It is equally necessary to accept Europe's responsibility concerning the international creation of goods along the entire supply-chain.

Democratically Shaping the Energy Revolution

A future-oriented Europe needs to abandon coal and all other fossil energy sources. This requires focused funding directed at developing renewable resources. For the implementation of the radical turn-arounds in energy- and climate policy to work, a strengthening of public discourse is necessary. As is greater participation of affected citizens. By utilising models of energy democracy (e.g. energy cooperatives), it is possible to set a new course in favour of common interests and towards life opportunities for all, instead of individual pursuit of profits.

Transforming Mobility

Transportation of goods and passengers has evolved into the main source of greenhouse gas emissions in the EU. Increased energy efficiency in passenger cars is nullified by their expanding numbers while emissions caused by transport are continually escalating. However, reliance on passenger cars is still not predominantly based on matters of convenience but represents a necessity in many regions of Europe. People depend upon cars to meet their fundamental mobility needs. To counter this reality, alternative forms of mobility have to be promoted. By making appropriate investments, the unrealised potential for public transportation, especially in urban areas, needs to be engaged fully. Bicycle paths and pedestrian walkways need to be expanded while individual road traffic must be reduced to the unavoidable minimum. This will not only lead to declining greenhouse gas emissions but also result in better quality of air and life, lower particulate pollution while freeing up space in cities.

Supporting Sustainable Consumption

At the moment, ecological responsibility is passed on to individual consumers. A great number of people have to prioritise economic calculations over conscience and ecological awareness. They simply cannot afford higher-quality products that have less environmental impact. Good products can no longer remain luxury-goods exclusively available to the more affluent. Sustainability is not a privilege.

Responsibility needs to be shifted from consumers to producers. Currently, our system is in favour of goods produced as cheaply as possible, regardless of social or ecological conditions of production. Last decades' developments show: voluntary commitments do not suffice in effecting the necessary shift. For genuine transformation to occur, poor conditions of work and production have to be subjected to binding rules and explicit sanction mechanisms. Simultaneously, targeted funding is called for in order to offset existing disadvantages of socio-ecological modes of production (e.g. organic agriculture) concerning cost and infrastructure.

For a Sustainable Europe We Need to:

  • create modes of production and ways of life that enable a good life for all
  • reorientate economics away from single target „economic growth“ towards alternative, broader indicators of prosperity
  • include consumer-based indicators into measurements of greenhouse gas emissions and resource consumption, in order to increase transparency
  • reduce final energy consumption, swiftly phase out coal and other fossil resources and fund renewable energy sources
  • collaboratively organise energy supply that is affordable and democratic
  • fund public transportation, expand bicycle paths and pedestrian walkways
  • implement binding standards, explicit sanction mechanisms and targeted funding in order to secure sustainable and socio-ecological modes of production
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

Decent Work, Fair Wages

Decent and secure jobs form the basis of a good life. Presently, challenges such as globalisation, digitalisation and precarisation exert strong impacts on working environments. Simultaneously, the negative ramifications of austerity policies can be felt across Europe, creating uncertainty among large parts of the population and having detrimental effects on the quality of life. It is obvious therefore that new, progressive ways, enabling each and every one to lead a good life, are an imperative.

Securing Fair Wages

For Europe to be a truly liveable environment, it is important that full-time employment warrants safe existence. A guarantee that can only be reached via collective agreements or by statutory minimum wages. EU wide minimum wages – comprising at least 60% of median incomes in the respective countries – provide relief in areas where union protection does not suffice. Fair wages also include equal pay for work of equal value. This requires wage transparency and accountability for fair pay.

Reducing Working Hours

Productivity in the EU has increased substantially during the last decades. Still, real wages are remaining stagnant with maximum working hours even being hiked in many countries. Regarding the achievement of full employment, coordinated EU-wide reductions of working hours harbour enormous potential – especially in light of working environments that continue to be further digitalised. But it is not just that: reducing working hours also translates into improved quality of living, ecological sustainability and fairness.

Creating Working Conditions for the 21st Century

Designing good work not only depends upon issues of wage or working hours but also on working conditions. The trend towards precarious, atypical employment may represent an answer to an entrepreneurial longing for flexible working arrangements but it is certainly not in the best interest of workers. Recent examples for these practices are zero-hour contracts in the UK and Uber and Co‘s platform employment model. These modern forms of precarisation of low income groups exploit legal loopholes regarding employees' pay and social security; they are directly aimed at undermining EU worker protection. This trend must be put to an end.

For a Secure Europe We Need to:

  • strengthen collective agreement systems and unions and implement adequate minimum wages that guarantee safe existence and participation
  • create wage transparency and binding obligations to provide proof of fair payment
  • introduce coordinated reductions of working hours and intelligent modes of distributing working time
  • pass laws on decent working conditions (a ban of zero-hour contracts, for instance)
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

Equality Means Happiness

The European Union faces increasing challenges due to growing inequality concerning income and wealth. These disparities not only relate to simple issues of equity, they are also connected to issues of stability. Therefore the new guiding principle of the EU should be Equality Means Happiness.

Equality Translates into Happiness – On Many Levels!

If working income does not suffice, people have to rely on loans to finance consumption. Simultaneously, companies orientate themselves towards foreign markets to offset reduced domestic uptake. High levels of private debt and high current account surpluses both endanger the stability of national economies in Europe – vividly shown by the Euro crisis. Equal and fair distribution of income and wealth is, therefore, a fundamental condition for the creation of stability and economic success in the European Economic Area.

Inequality, however, is not only connected to economic instability. Numerous studies correlate inequality with increasing poverty and social exclusion, poor health, higher crime rates, declining levels of confidence in society, social tensions and imbalances of power relations. Reducing inequality is directly linked to creating more stability in society, regardless even of pre-existing notions of fairness.

We need a pan-European strategy aimed at further tackling inequality. Higher inheritance- as well as property taxes provide possible avenues for guaranteeing fairer distribution. Realising the so called “golden wage rule” – specifying that wage growth must be in accordance with growth in productivity – can also aid in curbing increasingly divergent developments concerning wages. Guaranteeing a living income for all people is equally important. It can be achieved via expanding (socio-ecological) welfare states but also via implementing new concepts such as participation incomes.

For a Fair Europe We Need to:

  • devise a pan-European plan for effectively combating poverty and social exclusion
  • implement tax measures to fight inequality within the EU (progressive income taxes, wealth- and inheritance taxes)
  • coordinate fiscal policy instead of entering into a race to the bottom
  • implement the “golden wage rule”
  • end austerity policies
  • guarantee a living income for all people, for example via the expansion of (socio-ecological) welfare states or via the implementation of new concepts (e.g. participation incomes)
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

Dare more Democracy

Following the financial crisis of 2008, trust in EU institutions has dropped steeply, vividly illustrated by the situation in Greece: seven out of ten Greeks had confidence in the European Commission in 2007, by 2018 the number had sunk to three. All the while senior politicians keep curtailing freedom of the press and questioning the universality of fundamental human rights (such as the right to asylum of displaced persons). And yet, committing to human rights as well as free media and a high level of trust in EU Institutions are of crucial importance for European democracies. These alarming trends need to be countered determinedly.

Opportunities for Participation for EU-Citizens

Pan-European collaboration is wholly dependent on the willingness of states to cooperate. Europe-wide crises have shown, however, that interests of individual member states, on numerous occasions run counter to the common interests of the EU. Often times, measures focussed on public interest are objected to on grounds of subsidiarity. This conflict between national interests and supranational requirements will only be defused if citizens gain a sense of being able to shape European politics and feel they will profit from it. In this way, interest in the European Union's work will grow and collective European issues will have a stronger standing in public discourse.

Shifting of Power within the EU

The European Council of Ministers consists of representatives appointed by their respective governments. Even though its members derive their democratic legitimacy only nationally, they are involved in supranational legislation. In order to democratise the EU and to include all its citizens in the legitimisation of legislation, the position of the (democratically elected) European Parliament has to be strengthened. Providing the EU Parliament with the right of initiative for legislative proposals represents a first step; to enable joint European actions, appropriate dimensions of pooled financial resources are necessary. The EU must therefore be allowed to collect taxes. Simultaneously, lobbying must be rendered wholly transparent (for instance via a European Lobby Registry) and drafting of legislative texts by private actors halted.

Democracy, Social- and Economic Policy

Besides democratising EU institutions, changes in economic- and social policy are called for in order to boost EU citizen's confidence in the EU. 22.4 % of EU citizens (especially women and children) still find themselves at risk of poverty and social exclusion. Real wages are stagnant; their share in national income has been declining for decades. Unemployment rates remain catastrophically high in countries such as Greece and Spain. Cuts in social expenditures are made in the middle of all this while the population is pitted against people who seek refuge in the EU, fleeing from poverty, war and environmental degradation. For people to find inspiration in the European Union once more, new trade- and investment policies are necessary – socially, ecologically and economically sustainable. Given the EU's position as largest economic region in the world, it possesses ample leeway and room for manoeuvre to enact such a fundamental change of course – more than it usually acknowledges or believes to possess.

For a Democratic Europe We Need to:

  • democratise European institutions, expand the competences of the European Parliament (for example via the right of initiative for legislative proposals)
  • enable the EU to directly collect taxes
  • establish transparency through introducing a mandatory European Lobby Registry
  • combat corruption consistently
  • change course concerning economic- and social policies in order to combat poverty and secure ecological sustainability
  • firmly commit to the upholding of fundamental human rights
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

Equality in all Areas

A fair and just Europe needs common initiatives to establish the equality of all people. To realise a Europe free from discrimination, a strategy for treating all people equally needs to be implemented throughout Europe.

Equal Opportunities for All, Formally...

Democracy needs representation – at all levels. Despite piecemeal progress, women remain strikingly underrepresented in both public and private domains. EU-wide, only 25% of supervisory board members of publicly listed companies are female. The situation of female representation in the public sector is similar. In the Hungarian Parliament, women only occupy 10% of seats, for example. Quota systems offer an opportunity for guaranteeing equal representation of the sexes in both private and public sectors.

… as Well as Tangibly

However, it will take even more than quota systems. Women must have a chance of greater participation in public life. Expanding childcare facilities plays a necessary and important role in the closing of the gender pay gap, especially since most of the unpaid-burden of household chores and care work is still carried by women. Recently the Icelandic government has illustrated how the abolishment of unequal pay can be realised: In the Icelandic model a law was passed obliging companies to document the wages of their employees in order to prove they are providing equal pay for equal work. These provisions need to be enhanced by reasonably conceived parental leave arrangements.

Improving Protection against violence

In 2011, the Council of Ministers approved the Council of Europe Convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence in Istanbul. Besides constitutionally anchoring gender equality and making female genital mutilation a criminal offence, the agreement calls for additional steps to protect women against violence. Although the agreement commonly referred to as Istanbul-Convention has presently been signed by 46 member- and non-member states, ratification of 16 EU countries is still pending. In the face of rising violence against women, it is essential that the convention be enacted as soon as possible and that plans are developed for its swift execution.

Treating all Humans Equally

Treatment of people whose sexual orientation and gender identity are diverse is just as important. They must have equal rights as well possibilities for exercising them. Same sex marriages need to be allowed in all EU countries. Added to this, legal protection against discrimination for transpersons is to be extended beyond the workplace. Eliminating optical harmonisation as a prerequisite for legal recognition of gender is also crucial. Transpersons experience discrimination in all life situations and therefore deserve the necessary protection.

For a Colourful Europe we need to:

  • demand obligatory strategies to advance gender equality
  • introduce obligatory women’s quotas of 50% for parliaments and businesses
  • distribute household chores and care work in a fairer way, expand child-care facilities and design sensible parental leave arrangements
  • ban unequal pay for equal work and create wage transparency
  • implement and ratify the Istanbul Convention
  • rapidly implement measures to stop violence against women
  • Establish equal rights for all humans, independent of personal lifestyle choices
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

A Change of Course

Changing course in economic policies is a prerequisite for including fair distribution and economic sustainability in a common European agenda. The EU needs to abandon austerity politics, reduce pressures to consolidate and set out on a new road headed for economic policies of prosperity.

New Rules, New Union

Over the course of the last years, budgetary policy of the EU has proven itself to be rigid and prone to crisis. The Greek crisis has shown vividly how austerity measures might force an economy into a cul-de-sac. Fiscal rules of the EU strip governments of their fiscal leeway, once a certain threshold of debt has been crossed – effectively suffocating them. Implementing the Golden Investment Rule will increase flexibility of budget rules: practical, debt financed public expenditures used as economic incentives are to be excluded from public debt calculations. In that way, targeted fiscal stimuli can be utilised during times of demand-crises. At the same time, the merger of European Banks into the European Banking Union has to be completed, enabling the introduction of a standardised Financial Market Authority as well as the creation of a larger default safety net. Accomplishing the Banking Union is not enough however: the EU must also create a vision of how to keep tight reins on financial markets. Introducing a tax on financial transactions is a promising path, rethinking the regulation of financial products represents another: bans should be replaced by a (directive) list of authorised products. All financial products not explicitly included on the list are automatically prohibited. Such a strategy would curtail the freedom of financial groups concerning the avoidance of rules and the concoction of new financial products.

Combating Tax Evasion

Globally generated wealth is not only distributed disproportionately among countries but also within domestic borders. Corporations exploit legal loopholes to dodge taxes and thus avoid contributing their fair share to society. Digital behemoths (Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon, Microsoft) are especially notorious for their practices of raking in billions of profit while escaping taxation in Europe. Digital economy taxes, for example as advertising fees for online advertisements, will aid in rendering tech giants liable and drain tax swamps. It is paramount that a register reporting states and institutions which enable tax dodging, tax evasion and tax fraud be created. The same holds true for an explicit catalogue of possible sanctions. This necessitates common European rules. By establishing domestic internet companies, the EU can also actively contribute to the breaking of the monopoly of US corporations.

For a Stable Europe We Need to:

  • change course and set out on a path for economic policies oriented towards prosperity
  • introduce new European fiscal rules, implement the Golden Investment Rule
  • strengthen the Banking Union which will aid a standardised Financial Market Authority
  • introduce financial transaction taxes as well as directive lists of authorised financial products
  • introduce digital taxes, for example advertising fees for online advertisements
  • combat tax evasion coordinately throughout EU member states
  • establish European internet companies (for example via funding of the European Union)
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

Shaping a Europe Worth Living in

Public infrastructures create freedom and security for all people. They are cornerstones of democracy. Supplying education, health, mobility, water, room to live and many more provisions to everyone, ranks among the most essential tasks of the public domain. Subjecting these sensitive sectors to profit orientation, runs the risk of ghettoisation and social exclusion. This cannot happen.

Supporting Caregivers

Caregivers in Europe are hopelessly overburdened. Numerous European countries even label it the nursing crisis. In Germany, for example, the ratio of patients versus caregivers is 1000 to 19. Caregivers work for meagre salaries and in precarious forms of employment. The level of attractiveness of domestic care sector jobs is so low that it has led to the creation of a subcategory of the „brain-drain“, the „care drain“. „Care drain“ sees caregivers migrating into countries that offer better wages for their jobs. This contributes to a lack of care supply in the countries of origin, which in turn has to be compensated by immigrants from regions that are economically weaker still. A vicious circle of reproducing inequality ensues, leaving the poorest of the poor completely without care. Care professions must be appreciated more, working conditions have to be improved and care personnel needs to be increased in numbers.

Creating Social Security

Every single child in Europe deserves equal opportunities in life. Youth measures, systematically targeted at preventing social exclusion, mark a first step. The Child Guarantee Program represents a viable approach: every child at risk of poverty in the EU is supposed to be entitled to free health care, childcare, education and other provisions such as board and lodging. In combination with a fully funded/age-adjusted version of the already implemented education guarantee, this would effectively curb social marginalisation while also countering growing inequality.

Shaping Affordable Living

Affordable living is one of the most pressing issues in urban regions. Without active support of socially-inclusive public housing policies, cities will experience social marginalisation and gentrification. If public authorities fail to create distinct public counterweights, residential buildings quickly turn into playgrounds for investors and speculators. Thousands and thousands of flats are currently vacant in European cities. While the number of available apartments decreases, rental rates are skyrocketing. Housing speculation must be contained immediately and public housing policies extended.

For a Europe Worth Living in We Need to:

  • protect collective assets such as water or seeds and stop the privatisation of public property
  • guarantee access to top healthcare, sufficient living space, top education and nutrition to all people, especially children
  • appreciate and revalue the care profession, including better working conditions as well as an increase in personnel
  • enact laws against housing speculation; support and strengthen public housing initiatives
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at

Trading between Equals

Currently, European wealth stems to a large extent from exploitation and environmental destruction in countries of the global south. In the future, goods manufactured following these practices must be denied access to the EU. Only in doing so, will a good life be attainable for all.

Exploitation and Environmental Destruction

When 1135 workers were killed and 2438 injured in the collapse of a Bangladeshi textile factory six years ago, the conditions of textile workers working for global corporations dominated newspaper covers in Europe. Their plight in the countries of the global south has repeatedly been the centre of European attention ever since – but only when workers find their death in inhumane working conditions. Atrocious production conditions, low environmental standards or waste of resources are no irrefutable laws of nature, however. They are a product of conscious political decisions in favour of deregulated and liberalised markets.

Systemic Consequences

Unrestrained competition, especially in a globalised economy, tends to undermine central aspects of co-existence. The system rewards those who gain a competitive edge by avoiding social obligations. Companies that manufacture textiles under barbaric conditions in Bangladesh (catastrophic working conditions, child labour, wage dumping, union bans, ...) dominate the textile industry. By keeping production standards low, they pressurise competitors whose production is more expensive because they adhere to societal and ecological requirements. Simultaneously, the European Union is destroying markets in other parts of the world (e.g. Africa) by exporting strongly subsidised agricultural produce. Poor working conditions, repercussions of environmental degradation (e.g. climate change) and precarious economic situations cause migration and human exodus worldwide. Populist parties in the EU capitalise on this fact in order to pit low-income groups against each other and to distract from actual questions of distribution.

Developing Fair and Sustainable Trade

Individuals are often burdened with being responsible for ethical and sustainable consumption despite the fact that structural solutions, such as fair trade agreements enabling on par exchange, are necessary. The establishment of a European Control Agency for commodities provides a possible avenue. This newly created institution will be tasked with controlling working conditions, product quality and the environmental impact of products over their entire lifecycle (production, usage, disposal). After being approved by the Agency, products that meet the standards concerning working conditions and environmental impact will be allowed into the EU. All other products will be prohibited from sale in Europe. In that way, future obligations for control and execution of these standards will be shifted from individuals to democratically legitimised institutions. The organisation will also benefit consumers by creating improved quality of products while providing certainty that the goods consumed were manufactured sustainably and under humane conditions. The domestic European market is the second largest economic region in the world, it possesses enough clout to execute these forms of control and thus enact global improvements of living-, working- and environmental conditions.

For a Just Europe We Need to:

  • set mandatory standards for imports from non-EU countries concerning working conditions and environmental impact
  • establish a European Control Agency for commodities and for controlling the set standards
  • demand fair- instead of free trade agreements
What issues did we miss? Send your idea for a fairer Europe to office@jbi.or.at
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Please choose from the following solutions:

Transformation Now!

Humankind has formed our planet like no other species. 97% of all scientists confirm that the ongoing increase in global temperatures is anthropogenic. Ramifications of this climate catastrophe can already be perceived: Storms, floods and heat waves have become the new normal. Despite the fact that they contribute only very little to total greenhouse gas emissions, it is the poorer segment of the population in Europe and in the global south that suffers the most from global warming. In order to stop these developments and to be able to avert catastrophic long-term consequences, an immediate re-orientation towards new modes of production as well as modes of living is necessary.

New Indicators of Prosperity

Tightly interwoven into all issues related to climate policy and sustainable development, is the discussion concerning the rating of living standards and progress. Currently, economic growth (GDP) is the indicator most commonly used. Until now, increase in wealth and economic growth went hand in hand with greater emissions. Implementing new indicators for wealth marks a crucial step towards prioritising the aims of sustainable development. This would highlight their importance in the debate about the future which has, so far, been dominated by economic considerations. We have to make every effort to adjust our ways of life to our planet's finite resources and to distribute life opportunities as evenly as possible. For it is clear: the climate objectives will only be met if we reduce our overall energy consumption and distribute it anew.

In doing so, transparency is pivotal. Conventional pollution measurement methods apportion emissions occurring during manufacture of products to the country where the production site resides. By outsourcing the production of pollution-intensive goods to other countries, emissions are omitted from domestic statistics – even if these wares continue to be consumed nationally. Simply rendering domestic production cleaner will therefore not suffice. It is equally necessary to accept Europe's responsibility concerning the international creation of goods along the entire supply-chain.

Democratically Shaping the Energy Revolution

A future-oriented Europe needs to abandon coal and all other fossil energy sources. This requires focused funding directed at developing renewable resources. For the implementation of the radical turn-arounds in energy- and climate policy to work, a strengthening of public discourse is necessary. As is greater participation of affected citizens. By utilising models of energy democracy (e.g. energy cooperatives), it is possible to set a new course in favour of common interests and towards life opportunities for all, instead of individual pursuit of profits.

Transforming Mobility

Transportation of goods and passengers has evolved into the main source of greenhouse gas emissions in the EU. Increased energy efficiency in passenger cars is nullified by their expanding numbers while emissions caused by transport are continually escalating. However, reliance on passenger cars is still not predominantly based on matters of convenience but represents a necessity in many regions of Europe. People depend upon cars to meet their fundamental mobility needs. To counter this reality, alternative forms of mobility have to be promoted. By making appropriate investments, the unrealised potential for public transportation, especially in urban areas, needs to be engaged fully. Bicycle paths and pedestrian walkways need to be expanded while individual road traffic must be reduced to the unavoidable minimum. This will not only lead to declining greenhouse gas emissions but also result in better quality of air and life, lower particulate pollution while freeing up space in cities.

Supporting Sustainable Consumption

At the moment, ecological responsibility is passed on to individual consumers. A great number of people have to prioritise economic calculations over conscience and ecological awareness. They simply cannot afford higher-quality products that have less environmental impact. Good products can no longer remain luxury-goods exclusively available to the more affluent. Sustainability is not a privilege.

Responsibility needs to be shifted from consumers to producers. Currently, our system is in favour of goods produced as cheaply as possible, regardless of social or ecological conditions of production. Last decades' developments show: voluntary commitments do not suffice in effecting the necessary shift. For genuine transformation to occur, poor conditions of work and production have to be subjected to binding rules and explicit sanction mechanisms. Simultaneously, targeted funding is called for in order to offset existing disadvantages of socio-ecological modes of production (e.g. organic agriculture) concerning cost and infrastructure.

For a Sustainable Europe We Need to:

  • create modes of production and ways of life that enable a good life for all
  • reorientate economics away from single target „economic growth“ towards alternative, broader indicators of prosperity
  • include consumer-based indicators into measurements of greenhouse gas emissions and resource consumption, in order to increase transparency
  • reduce final energy consumption, swiftly phase out coal and other fossil resources and fund renewable energy sources
  • collaboratively organise energy supply that is affordable and democratic
  • fund public transportation, expand bicycle paths and pedestrian walkways
  • implement binding standards, explicit sanction mechanisms and targeted funding in order to secure sustainable and socio-ecological modes of production
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